Harold & Maud’Dib

Harold & Maud’Dib is part of the Museum of Television Network (MOTN) series entitled “Orphans”. A month long retrospective on TV shows that had extremely short runs (less than four episodes) or never made it past the pilot stage.
Harold & Maud’Dib was a science fiction-buddy-comedy series that tried to capitalize on the blockbuster sci-fi move Dune and the quirky appeal of actor Bud Cort. It ran for two weeks as a summer replacement in 1986. The premise of the half hour show was Paul Maud’Dib (Kyle Maclachlin) the future leader of the free universe is caught in a time warp while inspecting “spice mines” on the planet of Arrakis. He winds up in present day Los Angeles in the office of a mopey, down on his luck private investigator Harold (Bud Cort) who’s still mourning the death of his octogenarian lover, Maude. In the first of the two episodes “Getting to Know You”, Harold is still convinced that Paul is crazy and introduces him to his psychiatrist friend Mona (Margot Kidder). Paul saves the day by using the “weirding ways” on a bunch of thugs sent by Boss Rocco (Efram Zimbalist Jr.). The second episode “The Mix-Up” has Harold trying to find a spice called Melange that Paul is always talking about (this was supposed to be an ongoing theme), in this episode he winds up with Saffron. Paul meanwhile is investigating a case involving Freemasons which he confuses with the Freman from planet Arrikas and is almost arrested when he keeps insisting that he’s their leader. This episode also featured ex-football player Joe Nameth as Duke Hooper a streetwise informant.
Harold & Maud’Dib failed to capitalize on “Dune Fever” which never really materialized and was replaced after two weeks with reruns of Pig in a Poke.

Check local listings for time and date
.harold2Kyle MacLachlin

    • klutch
    • March 2nd, 2009

    OK, this one makes you a god among men

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